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Dylan Thomas

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In Dylan's Footsteps

Wales was Dylan Thomas’ inspiration for his plays and poems. This itinerary has been put together to highlight some of the places that influenced him. It’s your choice either follow the whole itinerary or pick out the day(s) that appeal to you.

 

Day 1

Dylan’s description of Swansea was a “lovely, ugly town” . Today there are lots of developments to enhance the loveliest part of this coastal city!

 

5 Cwmdonkin Drive, is in the Uplands suburb of Swansea and about half an hours walk (or a short bus ride) from the centre, but it’s worth it to see where Dylan spent his early life. This Victorian house is where he wrote over half of his poems and many short stories and a blue plaque marks ‘Dylan Thomas’ birthplace’.

 

Cwmdonkin Park – Dylan played here as a child and inspired him throughout his life. There is a monument in the park, it is a rock from a local quarry with the closing lines of one his best loved poems ‘Fern Hill’ which recalls his magical holidays to his father’s birthplace in Carmarthenshire.

 

Kardomah Cafe on Portland Street is where Dylan Thomas and his friends, "The Kardomah Boys" often met. Dylan described it as "My Home Sweet Homah". Depending on the time pop in for a coffee or lunch as the cafe is just as popular today with a new generation of loyal customers enjoying a coffee, roast dinners and home-made cakes...and lively discussion.

 

Dylan Thomas Centre is next, it was the city’s Guildhall but was opened as the Dylan Thomas Centre in 1995 by US President Jimmy Carter. It is a literature centre that houses a multi media exhibition called ‘Man and Myth’, a mock up of his writing shed in Laugharne, touring exhibitions and a programme of lectures.

 

Dylan Thomas Book Shop, if you are inspired to read some of his work after retracing his steps, head to this bookstore it has a comprehensive collection of his books, including some first editions.

 

Overnight in Swansea

 

Day 2

 

Gwili Railway is near Carmarthen.  Scenes from the ‘The Edge of Love’ were filmed here, as the film makers wanted to recreate a living section of a Great Western Railway branch line in rural West Wales. It is the only steam standard gauge railway operating in South West Wales. The return journey takes approx one hour starting at Bronwydd Arms Station, and the steam train follows the route, originally taken by the Carmarthen to Aberystwyth line.

 

Laugharne is a quiet village with stone cottages, cobbled streets and a 12th century castle located on the estuary of the River Taff. It is here that Dylan and his family moved to in 1949 and where he wrote the play ‘Under Milk Wood’, infact some believe that this is Llareggub the fictional village in the play (and yes you do know what it spells backwards!).

 

Dylan Thomas Boathouse is at the end of a narrow lane. On arrival you will see the family’s living room, just as they left it and the ‘wireless’ is playing Dylan reading his work. There is a video upstairs about Dylans life and various paintings of Laugharne by local artists.

 

Writing Shed is en-route to the village, look through the window to see where Dylan wrote ‘Under Milk Wood’ and the basic conditions he worked. The scrunched up paper by his desk gives the impression that he has just popped over to ‘Browns Hotel’ for a favourite tipple!

 

St Martins Church is nearby, it’s here where Dylan and his wife Caitlin are buried in the churchyard and the grave is marked by a simple white cross. In the church there is a replica of the memorial stone to Dylan in Poets Corner, Westminster Abbey in London.

 

At the last count Wales has 641 castles, so you have to visit at least one. Laugharne Castle dates from the 12th century and was built to look out for the sea. It was transformed in Tudor times into a gentlemans mansion. The castle was once owned by the writer Richard Hughes a family friend and the Thomas’ used to stay with him and Dylan sometimes used the gazebo in the castle grounds when writing.

 

No Dylan Thomas visit to Laugharne is complete without a visit to Browns Hotel. His cast iron table still sits in a window alcove with just a few pieces of memorabilia nearby. Many locals still remember him, so you’re sure to hear some first hand stories!
 

 

Overnight in Laugharne. 

 

Day 3

 

Thinking about Dylan Films, Edge of Love and Under Milk Wood starring Richard Burton are the two that spring to mind and today’s itinerary the film locations.

 

New Quay, also claims to be ‘Llareggub’ and it is easy to imagine with its narrow streets, harbour and Victorian terraces. In fact many of the plays characters are based on Newquay’s residents.

 

Gomer House was the home of Captain Tom Polly, Dylan's inspiration for Captain Cat.

 

London House was the home and shop of Dylans friend Norman Evans. He was thought to be the inspiration for 'Under Milk Wood's' 'Nogood Boyo'.


Dolau Inn was the favourite pub of Caitlin and the actors Richard Burton drank here when visiting New Quay.

 

The Black Lion Hotel was Dylan's favourite and was owned by his friend Jack Pat (Patrick). The Dylan Restaurant in the basement here has a large collection of Dylan Thomas memorabilia.

 

The Sea Horse used to be known as the 'Commercial'. Prior to that it was known as the Sailor's Home Arms - providing the name for 'Under Milk Wood's 'Sailor's Arms.

 

It’s a scenic coastal drive down to Fishguard – there’s a choice either the quicker A487 or take some of the narrower country lanes, great during the summer as the road sides are full of colourful wild flowers and great views of the sea too.

 

Lower Fishguard is the setting for the 1972 film Under Milk Wood starring Richard Burton. Not much has changed since then, so take a wander along the lanes and imagine Captain Tom Cat, Myfanwy Price and Rosie Probert passing by!

 

Overnight Fishguard.
 

 

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